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High School

Connecting students to college opportunity and success hinges first and foremost on their successful completion of high school. Unfortunately, for young men of color, their experiences and outcomes at this stage in the pipeline too often fail to position them for postsecondary educational success. Examine the three key focus areas of the literature on minority males in high school.

Achievement in high school is measured by a number of outcomes, including performance on standardized tests, grades and placement in gifted and talented or special education programs.

The Figures

Percentage of 12th-Graders Scoring Below Basic in Reading on NAEP in 2009, by Race/Ethnicity

Percentage of 12th-Graders Scoring Below Basic in Mathematics on NAEP in 2009, by Race/Ethnicity

The Facts

Explore key data

In 2009, Asian American/Pacific Islander 12th grade males were
47%
more likely to score below basic in reading on NAEP than their female counterparts.
In 2009, American Indian 12th grade males were more than twice
119.2%
as likely to score below basic in reading on NAEP than their female counterparts.
In 2009,
64.0%
of African American 12th grade males scored below basic in mathematics on NAEP.
In 2009,
51.1%
of Hispanic 12th grade males scored below basic in mathematics on NAEP.

In the high school context, persistence can be measured by indicators that describe students’ progress toward diploma/credential attainment, including absenteeism, grade retention, suspension and expulsion, as well as high school status dropout and graduation rates.

The Figures

Status dropout rates (percent) of 16- through 24-year-olds by race/ethnicity and gender: 2008

The Facts

Explore key data

In 2008, the status dropout rate for black 16- through 24-year-old males was
12.1%
In 2008, the status dropout rate for Asian 16- to 24-year old males was
20.7%
higher than that of their female counterparts.
In 2008, the status dropout rate for Native Hawaiian/Pacfic Islander 16- to 24-year-old males was
24.1%
lower than that of their female counterparts.
In 2008, the status dropout rate for Hispanic 16- to 24-year old males was
21.9%
In 2008, the status dropout rate for American Indian/Alaska Native males was
16.9%

Across racial/ethnic groups, the research literature consistently mentions the importance of supportive environments and relationships in fostering positive educational outcomes for high school students. In analyses related to achievement and persistence, scholars have noted disparities in such areas as teacher expectations, counselor engagement, parental involvement, and community resources, which can profoundly shape students’ attainment.