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In 2008, only
33.4%
of male Hispanic high school graduates aged 15 to 24 were enrolled in postsecondary education.

Harry, 24

African American, senior, four-year public school, Northeast

The Student Experience

92 African American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino and Native American young men from 39 institutions across the U.S. talked about their college experience and how they interact with the higher education system. The College Board, in collaboration with the Business Innovation Factory, presents the roadblocks and catalysts these students face through their voices and their stories.

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The fastest growing populations in the country are those minority groups with the lowest levels of male educational attainment.

If present levels of education and current population trends hold, the United States will see a decline in the educational attainment of the country as a whole. The goal of ensuring the future global competitiveness of the U.S. cannot be met without the full participation of our nation's young men of color.

It is our hope that this work provides insights that help make this possible.

Learn more about the initiative

Recommendation Three

Reform education to ensure that all students, including young men of color, are college and career ready when they graduate from high school.

Creating new policy.

Download the legal implications and policy guidance brief.

Committed to diversity.

Learn how College Board is
making a difference.